09/06/2021 09:19 GMT+7 Email Print Like 0

The world on ao dai

Ao dai is a national cultural heritage associated with the beauty of Vietnamese women. To honor the value of the Vietnamese traditional costume over the centuries, 15 designers introduced 15 collections inspired from 15 countries around the world in a fashion show at the Temple of Literature - Quoc Tu Giam, Hanoi.
Designer Minh Hanh, General Director of the show, said that the topic of putting the world on ao dai is extremely difficult for young designers because it requires design skills to make costumes more flexible, more vivid, and realistic.

"The world on Vietnamese ao dai" is a very important milestone on the journey of Vietnamese heritage because it is not only ethnic in appearance but also with special materials including Vietnamese silk and hemp fabrics.

On a unique stage designed with green hemp and white silkworm cocoons, professional and amateur models wearing ao dai walked gracefully. The stage effects with spring raindrops, lights, candles, silk, and smoke brought an emotional response to the spectators.

Opening the show was the pure Vietnamese collection of designer Hue Thi. Using silk as the main material, Hue Thi displayed images of a S-shaped map and the heroic history of Vietnamese people on an ao dai. The highlight of the performance was models walking on the runway with rice plants and lotus flowers.


The fashion show "The world on Vietnamese ao dai" is part of the event "Our Ao Dai"
which takes place at the Temple of Literature - Quoc Tu Giam, Hanoi. Photo: Khanh Long / VNP



More than 600 traditional outfits were shown at Van Mieu - Quoc Tu Giam. Photo: Khanh Long / VNP


The show not only has the participation of Vietnamese models and artists,
but also the ambassadors and their spouses. Photo: Khanh Long / VNP



The collection by designer Trinh Bich Thuy inspired by Greece. Photo: Khanh Long / VNP


People's Artist Lan Huong wears an ao dai which was inspired by
the Thai designer Tran Thanh Man. Photo: Khanh Long / VNP



People's Artist Minh Hoa in an ao dai by designer Ha Duy. Photo: Khanh Long / VNP


Designers have brought cultural details from different countries to their ao dai collection.
Photo: Khanh Long / VNP



The show is a new imprint of Vietnamese fashion on the journey
to assert itself as a cultural heritage. Photo: Khanh Long / VNP

The dance performances from Thailand came to life through the collection showing the royal elegance by designer Tran Thanh Man. His ao dai collection uses traditional hand-woven hemp fabric. With a cube-shaped cut-out technique, Tran Thanh Man brought a modern look to the typical “Gold Temple” image of Thailand. This collection attracted more spectators with its fun music and traditional dances of models.

Taking the audience to the Netherlands, designer Phuong Thanh showed an image of the tulip on 15 outfits. Phuong Thanh put all the colors and features of the tulip on the ao dai using organza silk. With the 3D patterns and multi-layers of silk, spectators can see floating tulips on the outfits.

When it comes to ao dai, people often think of gentle and soothing designs. With the theme of American dreams, designer Cong Huan gave spectators another image of Vietnamese ao dai.

More than 600 traditional outfits were shown at Van Mieu - Quoc Tu Giam by more than 400 participants, especially the wives of the international ambassadors and famous Vietnamese actresses.

One of the highlights of the show was the ao dai performance by disabled people in designer Ngoc Han's India-themed collection.

Ngoc Han said that the ao dai itself is the outfit for everyone. She wants people with disabilities to get rid of their inferiority feelings and help people with disabilities become more confident and inclusive in life.

People's Artist Tra Giang on the runway.
Photo: Khanh Long / VNP
Bold Vietnamese characteristics in the designs
by Hue Thi. Photo: Khanh Long / VNP


Bold Vietnamese characteristics in the designs
by Hue Thi. Photo: Khanh Long / VNP


Designer Ngoc Han's India-theme ao dai collection.
Photo: Khanh Long / VNP 


The collection by designer Thien Khanh inspired by
South Korea’s traditional Hanbok. Photo: Khanh Long / VNP


Cao Duy’s ao dai collection is inspired by China’s wonders.
Photo: Khanh Long / VNP 


Designer Ha Duy's Japan-themed collection.
Photo: Khanh Long / VNP

Designer Ha Duy's Japan-themed collection.
Photo: Khanh Long / VNP


With the theme of American dreams, designer Cong Huan gave spectators
another image of Vietnamese ao dai. Photo: Khanh Long / VNP
 

Designer Phuong Thanh’s collection takes the audience to the Netherlands.
Photo: Khanh Long / VNP

 
Story: Ngan Ha        Photos: Khanh Long        Translated by Hong Hanh