30/03/2021 11:40 GMT+7 Email Print Like 0

Mekong delta sticks to sustainable development

The integrated master plan for the Mekong delta from 2021 to 2030 with a vision toward 2050 under Government Resolution 120 has brought about hopes for the region which is the country’s biggest producer of rice, fruit and seafood. To realize Resolution 120, Prime Minister Nguyen Xuan Phuc last month chaired the third conference for climate resilience and sustainable development of the Mekong delta in Can Tho. 
After more than three years of implementing Government Resolution No. 120,  2017 on climate resilience and sustainable development of the Mekong delta, the delta has undergone positive changes toward proactive adaptation to climate change. Before the outbreak of COVID-19, the region’s GDP had sustained a relatively high growth rate of around 7.3% in the two consecutive years of 2018 and 2019.

At the conference, Prime Minister Nguyen Xuan Phuc introduced a new strategic viewpoint for developing the delta, which involved eight “Gs”.

The Prime Minister pointed to the first “G”, which is giao thong (transport), saying that resources must be prioritized to develop irrigation transport and highway systems to create convenient connections and facilitate economic activities in the region.


Prime Minister Nguyen Xuan Phuc inspects the area affected
by climate change in the Mekong river delta. Photo: Thong Nhat/VNA



Prime Minister Nguyen Xuan Phuc chairs the third conference on climate resilient
and sustainable development of Mekong river delta. Photo: Thong Nhat/VNA



Prime Minister Nguyen Xuan Phuc delivers a speech at the conference. Photo: Thong Nhat/VNA
 

The Vietnamese Prime Minister and delegates at the conference. Photo: Thong Nhat/VNA


On the sideline of the conference, Prime Minister Nguyen Xuan Phuc has a reception for international delegates
who represent for partners, organizations and sponsors. Photo: Thong Nhat/VNA



World Bank Country Director for Vietnam, Carolyn Turk speaks at the conference. Photo: Thong Nhat/VNA
 

Delegates at the conference. Photo: Thong Nhat/VNA

“The Mekong delta makes up 50% of the country’s rice output, 95% of rice exports, 65% of aquaculture output and 70% of fruit output.”
Prime Minister Nguyen Xuan Phuc
The second “G” is giao duc (education), which, according to the Prime Minister, is the golden key to sustainable development.

The third “G” is giang (rivers), an advantage of the delta which should be to develop agriculture, particularly rice and fruit, and aquaculture, as well as waterway transport and logistics. The Prime Minister suggested that a “river-based economy” for the region should be studied.

The next “G” is gan (connections), which means connections between central and local administrations; the State and the market; the people and enterprises; and domestic and international organizations. Prime Minister Phuc stressed the need to boost connections among the provinces within the Mekong delta.

The next “G” is giau (wealth), which means attracting wealthy people and businesses to do business in the region. To that end, localities in the region must create a favorable business environment as well as convenient facilities according to the Prime Minister.

The seventh “G” is gia (aging), which is now a challenge for the Mekong delta, where the population is aging faster than the national average, the Prime Minister pointed out, asking the region to proactively adopt policies to address the problem, including developing a better social security network.

The last “G” is gioi (gender), underlining the importance of enhancing gender equality, boosting women’s access to education and job opportunities in the context of the fourth industrial revolution.



At the conference, Prime Minister Nguyen Xuan Phuc introduced a new strategic viewpoint for developing the delta, which involved eight “Gs”.




The Mekong river delta seen from the Prime Minister Nguyen Xuan Phuc's inspection helicopter. Photo: Thong Nhat/VNA


The Mekong river delta was seriously affected by severe drought and saltwater intrusion. Photo: Nguyen Luan/VNP


Harvesting mushroom in the Mekong river delta. Photo: VNP
 

Fish cage raising on the Hau river, An Giang province. Photo: VNP

Country Director for Vietnam, Carolyn Turk, considered Resolution 120 a breakthrough as it marked the change from passivity in the face of climate change to proactive adaptation to nature.

After three years of implementing Resolution 120, the total state-funded capital invested through localities reached around 120 trillion dong, accounting for about 16% of the country’s total, including 80 trillion dong in targeted central budget funds, according to the Minister of Natural Resources and Environment Tran Hong Ha.
- The Mekong delta attracted over 14 billion US dollars in foreign direct investment during the three-year implementation of Resolution 120.

Story: VNP -  Photos: VNP, VNA - Translated by Nguyen Tuoi

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